Doctor, I See Double: Managing Cranial Nerve Palsies

Recorded On: 11/22/2017

This presentation provides necessary understanding of the signs and symptoms that accompany various types of neurogenic diplopia. An additional goal is to understand possible systemic implications and appropriate medical testing for patients presenting with diplopia. This course details in a case based format the diagnosis of patients presenting with diplopia. A diagnostic algorithm is presented to allow the audience member to follow the clinical findings to an appropriate differential diagnosis with emphasis on pertinent neuroanatomy and potential causative factors. Current therapeutic management and appropriate diagnostic testing is heavily emphasized and key points are reinforced with easy-to-remember 'Odes'. In order to receive distance learning credit for this course, please view it at https://learning.aaopt.org/products/doctor-i-see-double-managing-cranial-nerve-palsies-credit.

Joseph W Sowka, OD, FAAO

Professor of Optometry at Nova Southeastern University College of Optometry

Dr. Sowka is a Professor of Optometry at Nova Southeastern University College of Optometry where he serves as Chief of The Advanced Care Service and Director of the Glaucoma Service at the College‚Äôs Eye Institute. He is also Chair of the Department of Optometric Sciences. He is the longest tenured faculty member at the College. 

Dr. Sowka is a founding member of both the Optometric Glaucoma Society and Optometric Retina Society. He is formerly the Vice President of the Optometric Glaucoma Society and is currently the President of the Optometric Glaucoma Society Foundation. He is also the Vice Chair of the Neuro-Ophthalmic Disorders in Optometry Special Interest Group for the American Academy of Optometry. Dr. Sowka is a Glaucoma Diplomate of the American Academy of Optometry. He is the lead author of the annual Handbook of Ocular Disease Management published by Review of Optometry. 

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Doctor, I See Double: Managing Cranial Nerve Palsies